2006 Exige S

This is where we proud owners can upload information and pictures of our pride-and-joys (their Exige that is..)
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andybond
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Fonzey wrote: Mon Jun 15, 2020 3:05 pm
andybond wrote: Mon Jun 15, 2020 3:02 pm Must be. Default is hot so I guess multimeter across the motor to see if your getting any voltage?
I'm just going back through my old photos now to try and figure out the wiring.

When you say the default is hot, would you expect the flap to return to hot whenever the car is powered off? That's not happening right now, it just stays wherever it was last positioned... I think.
I would expect it to be in the last place it was as the power was cut as nothing to move it. I am sure I read the default is to be shut.
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Fonzey
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andybond wrote: Mon Jun 15, 2020 3:09 pm
Fonzey wrote: Mon Jun 15, 2020 3:05 pm
andybond wrote: Mon Jun 15, 2020 3:02 pm Must be. Default is hot so I guess multimeter across the motor to see if your getting any voltage?
I'm just going back through my old photos now to try and figure out the wiring.

When you say the default is hot, would you expect the flap to return to hot whenever the car is powered off? That's not happening right now, it just stays wherever it was last positioned... I think.
I would expect it to be in the last place it was as the power was cut as nothing to move it. I am sure I read the default is to be shut.
That's what I'm struggling to get my head around. I've also read/come to understand that the flap defaults to "heat", but that must mean that it has some mechanism to revert itself back to that position when the car is powered off - otherwise the concept of having a 'default' setting just does not apply. Perhaps I'm misunderstanding.

Anyway, I did a bit more fiddling last night - I'm somewhat sure that there's a loose connection in there somewhere, it seems like when I disturbed the wiring that it caused the issue, then when I wiggled all the connectors again it seemed to fix the issue again. Not much I can do to investigate properly as access is too tight, but at time of typing the AC system works fine - so hopefully it stays that way.

I'm fairly happy that the AC circuit itself is working as intended, which is good as that's the expensive bit. Fixing the heater box properly next time the clam comes off should be both cheap and easy, and there's a good mod (popular in the warmer US states it seems) to add an aftermarket bypass to the heater matrix to make it work more like a modern system - so may consider adding that if/when the front clam next comes off.
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andybond
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Fonzey wrote: Tue Jun 16, 2020 8:16 am

I'm fairly happy that the AC circuit itself is working as intended, which is good as that's the expensive bit. Fixing the heater box properly next time the clam comes off should be both cheap and easy, and there's a good mod (popular in the warmer US states it seems) to add an aftermarket bypass to the heater matrix to make it work more like a modern system - so may consider adding that if/when the front clam next comes off.
Oh?! Tell more?!

Ill be popping out this evening to take a look at my heater as its constantly blowing hot at well.
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Fonzey
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https://www.lotustalk.com/threads/heate ... R8OVrDfGOs

Wish I knew about this when the clam was off, it's my sort of mod is this.

Basically adds a little bypass switch to the dash somewhere which diverts coolant away from the heater matrix temporarily - it's how most modern heating circuits work and I imagine makes a huge difference especially to a non-AC car.
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Fonzey
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A rather useful chap on FB has notified me that I do indeed have the old temperature probe on the AC evaporator too - so that brings back the possibility that my AC system is freezing over whilst in use (mentioned it a couple of pages ago).

Wish I knew about all this when the clam was off, most of these modernisations are cheap and easy to do with the heater box out of the car.
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Fonzey
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I've always had a slight problem with how the rear seal sits on the hard top. It really does seem like every S2 I look at has a slightly different way for the seal to be applied - I guess it's just one of those 'quirks', but armed with a fresh length of OEM seal I got brave and started over.

Mine had two pieces of seal, one applied the full width of the roof and one stuck to the rear clam on the vent aperture:

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This created a bit of an air gap which both looked naff, but probably wasn't doing any favours to the efficiency of the roof scoop pre-charge cooler.

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I tore it all off, cleaned up the surfaces and applied one uninterrupted length of seal across the whole roof, including the scoop.

It now looks about 1000 better to my eyes, probably something that nobody else will notice... but hey ho, that's life!

Image
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Elahrairah
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Top work Kyle. I'm sure if it makes a difference to you then that's at least one more good nights sleep you'll have until you find the next thing :)
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Fonzey
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I tackled the steering rack riser plates today, I was putting it off a bit because I hear mixed things about how beneficial they actually are but also involves some time spent in the footwell which is never pleasant...

The steering rack attaches to the car through slotted holes in the front of the chassis, these slotted holes allow it to be fitted with approximately 8mm of vertical adjustment. The bolts are then supported by a plate which is riveted in place and has non-slotted holes.

My car with an OEM 130/130mm ride height came with plates fitted that placed the rack in its lowest position. For any factory car that launched with 120mm or lower ride heights, riser plates were fitted to move the rack up 8mm to shuffle the car back into the optimal area of the bump steer curve. Clever little design feature, makes for a very cheap adjustment when the plates are ~ £10 from [mention]seriouslylotus[/mention] .

I took my roof off and driver seat out to make room. Taking the wheel off would have been easier still, but I didn't bother.

Process should be:

- Drill out existing rivets
- Loosen both bolts in each footwell (4 total)
- Loosen the lower rack UJ pinch bolt just to allow movement.
- Remove the bolts from one side, the rack will drop down a bit.
- Remove the OEM plate
- Refit new plate with new rivet (3mm x 8mm seemed a good fit)
- Using a screwdriver in the smaller bolt hole you can gently raise the rack up a bit until the big bolt hole lines up. Refit the bolts
- Repeat on the other side of the car
- Torque up, don't forget the UJ pinch bolt.

I read some other guides that suggested the car should be jacked up, wheels removed, helper raising the rack manually through the chassis box section etc etc - but I didn't need any of that.

The job is less awful if you take all of your tools with you into the footwell first time around, and a few extensions makes the job significantly easier!

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Old vs New:

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Whether or not I'll notice a difference who knows, but they're in now - and I can't imagine there are any downsides to them.
DarrylH
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:thumbup: Nice one [mention]Fonzey[/mention] hopefully it’ll make some difference.
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Fonzey
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I had a bit of a test drive at the weekend, only a few miles but despite fighting really hard to not fall for confirmation bias I came home feeling pretty chuffed about the change.

When going through quicker bends I'm no longer feeling the wheel fidget in my hands quite so much. I struggle to describe it properly but before it almost felt that the steering was TOO communicative, each bump/undulation just tweaking at the wheel a bit when I wanted the steering to feel heavy and 'robust' in my hands. The steering now feels a lot smoother when it 'loads up' which gives the feeling of more grip (even though grip levels haven't changed) which encourages me to lean on the tyre a bit more - all good stuff, well worth the effort and £10.

Got Geo booked for Wednesday, I don't expect big changes - just level out the corner weights again and make sure I've not punted the front toe out too far.
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